Critical Acclaim for Saving Rome

“Award-winning journalist Megan K. Williams…relocated to Italy. The result: this engaging collection of fictional reports from the cultural ferment of Rome… The tension attained... is both riveting and very funny. Williams’s skill with dialogue, with the tempests it alternatively contains and releases, is consummate.”

The Globe and Mail

“Williams’ journalistic roots come shining through in her ability to shape a scene, layering elements to create a snapshot out of every paragraph, the focus sharp and the colours bright. Saving Rome is like a postcard from a friend with ‘Wish you were here’ scrawled on the back. Save the airfare and read this book instead.”
The Quill & Quire

"As her characters wrestle with a variety of conundrums, Williams treats them sympathetically but never simplistically. And she offers a few belly laughs too -- most notably in 'Let the Games Begin,' an oddly sexy, touching and wonderfully antic love story."
McGill News

"In one word, Saving Rome is wonderful... with the perfect balance of interesting characters, punchy dialogue, page-turning drama, comedy and impeccable pacing... When I finished reading the collection, my heart ached the way it does every time it comes face-to-face with beauty."
Herizons Magazine

"[A] tender-hearted and amusing first collection [with] fresh angles on themes of displacement, relationship ennui and disappointed expectations. Williams... has a clean, straightforward style, which is exactly what you'd expect from an accomplished journalist, and she reveals more intricate layers of plot at a graceful pace.... This is a great book to have on hand for summer travel, an assortment of prosaic delights with rich details about Italian culture.
NOW Magazine

“The results are brilliant, as the various characters find themselves in an array of amusing – and sometimes moving – circumstances… At times witty and clever, sometimes slapstick and silly, the prevailing sense of humour that underscores each chapter is offset perfectly by a tempered sadness that is felt, but rarely spoken…. The writing is crisp and clean and flows smoothly in a graceful journalistic style. Saving Rome is filled with one woman’s vision, warmth and charm.”
The Halifax Daily News

“Unlike many other novels or short stories compiled by vigorously intelligent journalists - Megan is not boring. These stories… are fiercely honest takes on Roman life and of the adjustments North Americans must make to live there in relative peace… Megan has captured the feelings of inadequacy and the longing for home that many foreigners feel, without being insulting.”
Here Magazine

"The Rome-based Williams is a meticulous observer who mines import from the details of daily life. Each of these stories is a small gale in a passing cloud. Williams’ stories excavate all that’s unsaid about living in Rome. She doesn’t so much save the city — an obvious irony — as demonstrate the frailty of its protocols, giving each of her characters believable flaws and desires. This is a stunningly accomplished first collection.
The American Magazine, Rome

"Megan K Williams' first published fiction includes nine wonderful short stories... The reader ends up pondering these imponderables despite, or perhaps because of, Williams' truly fresh and funny style that avoids the kitsch or cute characterizations common to books in the foreigner abroad category... Saving Rome is well worth the read if you have not picked it up already."
The Roman Forum Monthly
 

Cabin Fever

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The Best new Canadian Non-Fiction

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edited by Moira Farr and Ian Pearson, with introduction by Marni Jackson.

On the Edge

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Woman Making Hockey History

by Elizabeth Etue and Megan K. Williams

 

"On the Edge is an engrossing history of the 100-year-old women's game as it has been suppressed, ignored, subverted, and now suddenly 'discovered.'
The authors have sharp commentary on the old-boy network and the power of the NHL ..."
-- The New York Times

"exciting ... fascinating and controversial ... brilliant ..."
-- Toronto Star